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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

42
TABLE 3
Levels and Change in the Urban Population by World Regions, 1950-1970
World Region	Urban Population 1950	Urban Population 1970a	Rural/ Urban Change 1950-70	Point Difference 1950-70	P( Population   p< in Citiesb 1970a
DEVELOPING REGIONS					
Northern Africa	24.6	34.6	41	10.0	23.1
Western Africa	11.6	19.7	70	8.1	7.4
Eastern Africa	5.6	9.9	80	4.3	4.9
Middle and southern					
Africa	6.6	15.4	133	8.8	6.0
Middle America	39.2	53.0	35	13.8	20.1
Caribbean	35.2	42.5	21	7.3	20.7
Tropical South					
America	35.8	53.1	48	17.3	32.2
East Asia	12.1	25.3	109	13.2	16.1
Southeast Asia	13.6	20.1	48	6.5	12.1
Southwest Asia	24.2	35.5	47	11.3	21.7
South Central Asia	15.2	17.8	17	2.6	9.8
Oceania	4.9	8.5	73	3.6	0.0
DEVELOPED REGIONS					
Northern America	63.8	75.1	18	11.3	57.4
Temperate South					
America	59.1	70.2	19	11.1	52.1
Northern Europe	69.5	74.9	8	5.4	58.2
Western Europe	63.2	73.0	16	9.8	45.0
Eastern Europe	42.4	54.6	29	12.2	24.3
Southern Europe	41.5	50.7	22	9.2	29.6
Estimated.
b 100,000 or over.
Source: Kingsley Davis, World Urbanization 1950-1970. Vol. 1: Basic L Countries, and Regions. Population Monograph Series, No. 4. Berkeley International Studies, 1969.
occurred in the ancient world.) The tempo of urbanization another matter; it varies from nation to nation and from one his another. In general, countries that experienced their most intei urbanization in the 19th and early 20th centuries did so at a slo\ are the developing countries now in their most dynamic phase change. Another difference is, of course, the much more rapid o tion growth in the developing countries of today.so due to the rate of change of the rural populations. In the developed regions of the world, from 1960 to 1970 the rural population declined in absolute terms; in a number of developing regions rural growth exceeded 2 percent per annum.